Frans Hals

Il Ragazzo che Ride

Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy
Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy
Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy
Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy
Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy
Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy

Frans Hals
Il Ragazzo che Ride

1625 Visitabile tra Sala 16

Questo ragazzo allegro e sorridente, con i suoi occhi vivaci e i capelli arruffati, non è un ritratto, quanto piuttosto un ‘tronie’, ovvero lo studio di un ragazzo che ride. Le figure ridenti sono poco comuni, in quanto la risata è una delle espressioni più difficili da rappresentare nella pittura.

L’abilissimo Hals dipinse il ragazzo in maniera molto diretta e spontanea, servendosi di pennellate incredibilmente libere. Eppure l’artista sapeva esattamente ciò che stava facendo. Il naso del ragazzo, per esempio, è dipinto con una singola pennellata di bianco ben posta alla radice.

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Frans Hals  Lachende jongen Laughing Boy

Frans Hals
Il Ragazzo che Ride

1625 Visitabile tra Sala 16

Acquired with the support of the Rembrandt Association, the Prince Bernhard Culture Fund and the Friends of the Mauritshuis Foundation, 1968
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This is the most engaging laugh in seventeenth-century Dutch painting: a boy’s disarming grin rendered in loose brushstrokes by Frans Hals. Not in the least inhibited, the boy shows off his far from pearly white teeth. Also laid down in rapid strokes, his tousled hair adds to the exuberance radiating from this painting. So infectious is his merriment, both for modern viewers and also undoubtedly those of the seventeenth century, that it is almost impossible not to return his laugh.

The Laughing Boy is not a portrait. Here, Hals was not interested in producing a likeness of an existing boy, but rather in recording a spontaneous expression of joy. Smiles and laughter are notoriously difficult to depict, as is clear in the work of other artists. A painted smile quite often appears forced; sometimes it even resembles a grimace, while a burst of laughter was intended. Hals’ keen sense of observation and inimitable technique ensured that he surpassed his fellow painters in this area.

Hals painted several laughing boys and girls; in some instances as part of a series of the senses. These paintings were very popular, as evidenced by the substantial number of copies that were made of them. The fact that Hals also portrayed people laughing is unusual. Unlike now, in the seventeenth century people virtually never had themselves limned laughing. However, such a different kind of commission could safely be entrusted to an artist so skilled in depicting expressions. Nevertheless, a laugh as broad and spirited as in the Laughing Boy occurs nowhere in Hals’ portraits.

(this is a reworked version of a text published in: L. van der Vinde, Children in the Mauritshuis, The Hague 2007, pp. 44-45)

Dettagli

Informazioni generali
Frans Hals (Antwerp 1582/1583 - 1666 Haarlem)
Il Ragazzo che Ride
1625
painting
1032
Sala 16
Materiale e dettagli tecnici
oil
panel
30.45 cm diameter
Iscrizione
lower left, above the shoulder: FHF
in ligature

Origine

Albert, Baron von Oppenheim, Cologne, before 1876-1912; his sale, Berlin (Lepke), 27 October 1914, postponed to 19 March 1918, lot 16; Marie-Anne Friedländer-Fuld, Baroness de Goldschmidt-Rothschild, Berlin and Paris, 1918-1968; purchased with the support of the Rembrandt Association, the Prince Bernhard Culture Fund and the Friends of the Mauritshuis Foundation, 1968